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Journal of Forensic
Medicine and Toxicology
(International Edition)
A peer Reviewed Journal Dedicated to the
promotion of all branches of medicine and
science useful in the administration of justice.

 

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PATTERN OF HOMICIDES AT MORTUARY OF CIVIL HOSPITAL AHMEDABAD

Padmraj R.Y.1, Tandon R.N.1

 
 
 
 

Abstract:
Homicide is not receding with the passage of time. They continue to constitute the most important and significant of the heinous crimes by homosepians.

The rate of homicide has been the major indicator of violence levels all around the world1. Here, we made a study on homicides at mortuary of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad during the one year period of 2005 with special reference to demographic variables like month, day and time of homicide, age and sex of the victims, duration of survival after receiving fatal injury, cause of death, type of weapon, number of assailants, motive for homicide and the relation of accused with the victim.

 
 
 
 

Keywords:
Homicide, Victim, Injuries.

 
 
 
 

References:

  1. Indermaur D., Trends and issues in Crime and Criminal Justice No.61, Violent Crime in Australia: interpreting trends, 1996 : p.2–3.

  2. Delancy Joseph F., Sloane Charles W., Catholic Encyclopedia on CD Rom, Vol . 7, Online edition, 2003.

  3. Fox J.A. and Zawith M., Homicide trends in the United States, Bureau of Justice Statistics, October, 2000.

  4. Mouzous, J. (2000): Homicidal encounters, a study of homicides in Australia, Research and Public Policy Series, No. 28, 2000, pp – 19 – 25.

  5. Strang H., Homicides in Ausralia. Canbarra: Australian Institute of Criminology, 1992.

  6. Dikshit P.C. and Kumar A., Study of Homicidal deaths in Central Delhi. Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, 14 (1), 1997: 44–46.

  7. Ben Best et al., Death by Murder. FBI Uniform Crime Reports, 2003.

  8. Mouzous, J. (2000): Homicidal encounters, a study of homicides in Australia (1989-1999), Research and Public Policy Series, No. 28: pp–1–14.

  9. Sheikh M.I., Subramanyam B.V., Study of Homicides in Surat with special reference to changing trends. Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, 1995; 12 (1 & 2): 8–11.

  10. Saharan D.V., Tripathy A.K., Chandra J. and Dogra T.D., A Study of Murders in South Delhi, Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, 1988; 3 (4).

  11. Memchoubi P.H., Momonchand A. and Fimate L., (1981-2000). Homicides in and around Imphal, Journal of Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine, 2000, 25 (1).

  12. Murthy O.P. and Agnihotri K., Homicidal deaths in South Delhi, Journal of Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine, 2000; 22 (1 & 2): 9–11.

  13. Milroy C.M. and Ranson D.L., Homicidal Trends in the State of Victoria, Australia. American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, 1997, 18(3): 285 – 289.
     

 
 
 
 

Authors:

1. Corresponding Author: Assistant Professor,
B.J. Medical College, Ahmedabad
2. Professor & Head, Department of Forensic Medicine,
B.J. Medical College, Ahmedabad
 

 
     
     
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Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology,
Dept. of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences,
New Delhi, INDIA.